Environmental flows and ecological assets

Water managed and ‘allocated’ to the environment is commonly known as ‘environmental flows’.  The critical step in determining appropriate environmental flows is predicting how particular changes in river flows might affect natural ecological assets.  This project investigated the relationship between flow and several specific assets of tropical rivers.

Bayesian network models for environmental flow decision making in the Daly River, Northern Territory, Australia

Chan, T., Hart, B., Kennard, M., Pusey, B., Shenton, W., Douglas, M., . . . Patel, S. (2012). Bayesian network models for environmental flow decision making in the Daly River, Northern Territory, Australia. River Research and Applications, 28(3), 283-301. doi: 10.1002/rra.1456

Leaf litter chemistry, decomposition and assimilation by macroinvertebrates in two tropical streams

Pettit, N., Davies, T., Fellman, J., Grierson, P., Warfe, D., & Davies, P. 2012. Leaf litter chemistry, decomposition and assimilation by macroinvertebrates in two tropical streams. Hydrobiologia, 680(1), 63-77. doi: 10.1007/s10750-011-0903-1

The ‘wet–dry’ in the wet–dry tropics drives river ecosystem structure and processes in northern Australia

Warfe, D., Pettit, N., Davies, P., Pusey, B., Hamilton, S., Kennard, M., . . . Halliday, I. (2011). The ‘wet–dry’ in the wet–dry tropics drives river ecosystem structure and processes in northern Australia. Freshwater Biology, 56(11), 2169-2195. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2011.02660.x

Hydrological connectivity structures concordant plant and animal assemblages according to niche rather than dispersal processes

Warfe, D., Pettit, N., Magierowski, R., Pusey, B., Davies, P., Douglas, M., & Bunn, S. (2013). Hydrological connectivity structures concordant plant and animal assemblages according to niche rather than dispersal processes. Freshwater Biology, 58(2), 292-305. doi: 10.1111/fwb.12058

“We like to listen to stories about fish”: integrating Indigenous ecological and scientific knowledge to inform environmental flow assessments

Jackson SE, Douglas MM, Kennard MJ, Pusey BJ, Huddleston J, Harney B, Liddy L, Liddy M, Liddy R, Sullivan L, Huddleston B, Banderson M, McMah A & Allsop Q. 2014. “We like to listen to stories about fish”: integrating indigenous ecological and scientific knowledge to inform environmental flow assessments. Ecology and Society 19(1): 43. http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-05874-190143

Dynamics of in-stream wood and its importance as fish habitat in a large tropical floodplain river (journal article)

Pettit, N., Warfe, D., Kennard, M., Pusey, B., Davies, P., & Douglas, M. (2013). DYNAMICS OF IN‐STREAM WOOD AND ITS IMPORTANCE AS FISH HABITAT IN A LARGE TROPICAL FLOODPLAIN RIVER. River Research and Applications, 29(7), 864-875. doi: 10.1002/rra.2580

Dynamics of in-stream wood and its importance as fish habitat in a large tropical floodplain river (journal article)
An integrated assessment of financial, hydrological, ecological and social impacts of ‘development’ on Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in northern Australia

Hermoso V, Kennard MJ, Linke S (2013) Data Acquisition for Conservation Assessments: Is the Effort Worth It? PLoS ONE 8(3): e59662. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059662

Productivity, disturbance and ecosystem size have no influence on food chain length in seasonally connected rivers

Warfe, D., Jardine, T., Pettit, N., Hamilton, S., Pusey, B., Bunn, S., Davies, P. and Douglas, M. 2013. Productivity, Disturbance and Ecosystem Size Have No Influence on Food Chain Length in Seasonally Connected Rivers. PLoS One,8(6):1-11. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0066240

The project was led by Professor Peter Davis from the University of Western Australia. He was supported by a range of researchers with different technical expertise from Charles Darwin University, NT Fisheries Research Branch, Griffith University, Monash University and the Australian National University.