Floodplain foodwebs

As the wet season flows over top river banks, fish and other animals make the most of expanded feeding grounds, moving out onto the floodplains.  As the floodwaters recede, these animals take the nutrients and energy obtained from the floodplain, back to the river channel.  This project has described floodplain food webs, quantified the contribution of subsidies to, and from the floodplain, and determined how some current land management practices are affecting the floodplain food webs of northern rivers.

Hydrological connectivity structures concordant plant and animal assemblages according to niche rather than dispersal processes

Warfe, D., Pettit, N., Magierowski, R., Pusey, B., Davies, P., Douglas, M., & Bunn, S. (2013). Hydrological connectivity structures concordant plant and animal assemblages according to niche rather than dispersal processes. Freshwater Biology, 58(2), 292-305. doi: 10.1111/fwb.12058

Temporal and spatial variation in ecosystem metabolism and food web carbon transfer in a wet–dry tropical river

Hunt, R., Jardine, T., Hamilton, S., & Bunn, S. (2012). Temporal and spatial variation in ecosystem metabolism and food web carbon transfer in a wet‐dry tropical river. Freshwater Biology, 57(3), 435-450. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2011.02708.x

Terrestrial invertebrates of dry river beds are not simply subsets of riparian assemblages

Steward, A., Marshall, L., Sheldon, J., Harch, C., Choy, F., Bunn, B., & Tockner, S. (2011). Terrestrial invertebrates of dry river beds are not simply subsets of riparian assemblages. Aquatic Sciences, 73(4), 551-566. doi: 10.1007/s00027-011-0217-4

Large scale surveys suggest limited mercury availability in tropical north Queensland (Australia)

Jardine, T. D., Bunn, S. E., Halliday, I. A., Howley, C., & Sinnamon, V. (2012). Large scale surveys suggest limited mercury availability in tropical north Queensland (Australia). Science of the Total Environment, 416(C), 385-393. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.11.022

Biogeochemical implications of climate change for tropical rivers and floodplains

Hamilton, S. (2010). Biogeochemical implications of climate change for tropical rivers and floodplains. Hydrobiologia, 657(1), 19-35. doi: 10.1007/s10750-009-0086-1

Seasonal contrasts in carbon resources and ecological processes on a tropical floodplain

Pettit, N.E., Bayliss, P., Davies, P.M., Hamilton, S.K., Warfe, D.M., Bunn, S.E., & Douglas, M.M. (2011). Seasonal contrasts in carbon resources and ecological processes on a tropical floodplain.(Report). Freshwater Biology, 56(6), 1047-1064. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2010.02544.x

Fish mediate high food web connectivity in the lower reaches of a tropical floodplain river

Jardine, T., Pusey, D., Hamilton, B., Pettit, J., Davies, S., Douglas, K., . . . Bunn, P. (2012). Fish mediate high food web connectivity in the lower reaches of a tropical floodplain river. Oecologia, 168(3), 829-838. doi: 10.1007/s00442-011-2148-0

Carbon from periphyton supports fish biomass in waterholes of a wet-dry tropical river

Jardine, T., Hunt, R., Faggotter, S., Valdez, D., Burford, M., & Bunn, S. (2013). Carbon from periphyton supports fish biomass in waterholes of a wet–dry tropical river. River Research and Applications, 29(5), 560-573. doi: 10.1002/rra.2554

Carbon from periphyton supports fish biomass in waterholes of a wet-dry tropical river
Assessing the seasonal dynamics of inundation, turbidity and aquatic vegetation in the Australian wet-dry tropics using optical remote sensing

Ward, D., Hamilton, S., Jardine, T., Pettit, N., Tews, E., Olley, J., & Bunn, S. (2013). Assessing the seasonal dynamics of inundation, turbidity, and aquatic vegetation in the Australian wet–dry tropics using optical remote sensing. Ecohydrology, 6(2), 312-323. doi: 10.1002/eco.1270

Assessing the seasonal dynamics of inundation, turbidity and aquatic vegetation in the Australian wet-dry tropics using optical remote sensing
The project was led by Professor Stuart Bunn from Griffith University, along with researchers from Charles Darwin University, Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist, University of Western Australia and CSIRO.